People with disabilities: Accessibility Engineering Team at Google needs input

Hands typing on laptop keyboard

Hands typing on laptop keyboard

I just got a notice from the Accessibility Engineering Team at Google that says they’re conducting paid research sessions, and they’re looking for users with all types of disabilities to take part and help them make Google more accessible.

The notice said Google will be conducting studies in-person at offices in San Francisco and New York City. If you don’t live near either of those cities, you can still participate; they’ll be conducting some studies remotely via video or phone.

“User research studies help us improve Google products by allowing us to get feedback directly from our users,” the message said.

Here’s a link to the application form if you’re interested in signing up for a Google accessibility study and testing their products. When you sign up, you aren’t immediately enrolled in a study – but you’ll get notice when studies are being held.

I just signed up myself, and filling out the form took about ten minutes. Once I was done, I was given the link to a website I can go to anytime I want to opt out of being contacted for these studies — participation in Google’s User Experience Research studies is completely voluntary.


 

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  1. anastasia Says:

    What all does your mom need?


  2. Beth Finke Says:

    I know what you mean. Hard as I try to respond with a good comeback, I usually end up just saying, “thank you.”


  3. Matthew Says:

    People don’t usually try to do anything for me but it makes me uncomfortable sometimes when people try to give me a compliment but it’s something like “You’re good at your job, even though you’ve got a little hand.” I know that they’re trying to say they admire the way I don’t let my hand get in the way of doing anything, but I don’t like that they make a focus point of it. Like, you could just say “You’re good at your job.” and not mention my hand at all, you know? It kind of feels like they’re saying “I’m surprised that you can perform as well as an able-bodied person because I had already assumed you couldn’t.” even though I don’t rationally think that’s their intention.


  4. Beth Finke Says:

    Your mother is fortunate to have you, Tarah. Thank you for reaching out to us. I will forward your question on to Easter Seals Information and Referral Services and they will get back to you with information.


  5. Tarah Trouts Says:

    My elderly mother age 70 had hip replacement surgery. She is no longer able to walk. I am her caregiver out home is above ground due to Huricane Katrina zone changes. I can’t get my mother out of our home for any circumstance, Dr. Apt, fire, any emergency. Please let me know if there is any help with a wheel chair lift to we are in desperate need
    Thank you
    Tarah trouts


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